The World Walk

Another great travel adventure, this time from Tom Turcich. He left the United States in 2015 to walk across seven continents over a five year period.  He writes,

The dream of walking around the world formed at seventeen after my friend AnneMarie passed. Since her death I’ve decided to make the most of each day. I walk the world to become immersed in unknown places and be forced into adventure day after day. In Texas I adopted a dog, Savannah, and we’ve crossed every border together ever since. I write and take photos, and am hopefully getting better at both with each passing day.

He has Facebook and Instagram pages, as well as a website called The World Walk with beautiful stories and pictures.  I first heard about him from his Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) titled, “I am Tom Turcich, 687 days, 16 countries and 9600 miles into my dream of walking around the world. AMA!”  The AMA, in particular, has a lot of great discussions that could help others like him begin their own journey.

18947631_1698826290422436_3501331122942377984_n

Advertisements

Crossing the Pacific by Freighter

Recently, my family had an idea that perhaps we could start our RTW trip by crossing the Pacific on a one way cruise ship (for example, from San Diego to Sydney). Admittedly, we haven’t thought too deeply of all of the challenges with this idea – costs, sea sickness (especially for the kids) and so forth.

While looking into this plan, I came across one of the most interesting travel diaries I’ve ever seen.  The writer (YVR Cockroach) talks about his 17 day voyage across the Pacific on the CMA CGM Libra from Hong Kong to Long Beach.  This definitely does not seem like a good idea for a family with young kids.  At most an adventurous couple could enjoy this trip, though there are doubts since there is practically no conveniences or entertainment to be had (other than what you brought with you).  Having said that, if I were younger, single, had time on my hands, strapped for cash but needed to cross the ocean, I would certainly consider this…

If you want to try it, check out CMA CGM’s website at https://www.cma-cgm.com/products-services/cargo-cruise or their blog at http://www.cma-cgm-blog.com/cargo-cruises-travel-shipping-cargo/.

25960909871_f251a2ce4b_z

Another Family Has Gone RTW

From time to time, I like to look out into the vast arrays of the world wide web (do the kids still call it that?) and see who else might be planning their round the world (RTW) trips.  One family has a blog up at https://roundtheworldwithmyfamily.com where they are cataloging their adventure that has only begun a scant few months ago.  I’m curious as to why they picked the itinerary they did – it appears that they’re going around the world twice – and how that works out for them.  If you’re curious, their first blog post related to their “test” departure is here and it shows that things can get in the way of your best laid plans.

I’ll definitely be keeping up with this blog and watching how their trip unfolds.  Blogs like that one are definitely a great motivator and planning aide for our trip in a few years.

 

The Future Will be Smaller

From the Wall Street Journal, a big package on how life will be in 35 years: 2050: Demographic Destiny. In the developed world, the future will be smaller.

Next year, the world’s advanced economies will reach a critical milestone. For the first time since 1950, their combined working-age population will decline, according to United Nations projections, and by 2050 it will shrink 5%.

As Dave Pell writes in Nextdraft:

In other words, it turns out that the big problem in the world isn’t that there are too many people, but rather that there are too few (Thanksgiving dinners excepted).

What Kind of Traveller Are You?

Like anything, there’s all kinds of travellers in this world.  From those that barely go far enough to lose sight of their homes to those that travel to far off lands with the lightest of ease.  I would consider my family to veer towards the latter, as we’ve been lucky enough to travel to multiple countries with very little weighing us down.  Speaking of weight, I couldn’t imagine dragging giant rolling suitcases everywhere I go, like some travellers seem to always do.  2000 year old cobblestones and rough, unbeaten paths don’t work well with those flimsy luggage wheels, anyway.

So what kind of traveller are you?  Sarah Cooper of The Cooper Review has create cute illustrations that show different types of travellers (or, travelers for you Americans).   Here’s one, with more after the break (go to The Cooper Review for all of them!):

us

Read More

Singapore?

Singapore, and Malaysia in general, has always been on my list of go-to destinations.  Something about the look and feel of the city always mesmerized me – the vibrant colours are absolutely breathtaking.  Of course, there’s more than just the vistas that Singapore is known for.  The food – from hawker centres, to the rice dishes, Wall’s ice cream and the chili sauces are all high in my books.  Singapore has a vast history which tickles the dormant anthropologist in me (e.g., the Jackson Plan is interesting early racial segregation), while the growing pop culture scene is an exciting blend of religions, histories and cultures thanks to its sea port upbringing.  I’m not sure if Singapore will make it into our final travel plans, but hopefully it remains a contender.

Of course, I also just want to drink a Singapore Sling while listening to Tom Waits’ Shore Leave… in Singapore.  Luckily, there are travel articles detailing exactly where, and where not, to get your gin fix.

Anyway, the Internet has a vast expanse of reasons to visit Singapore.  But, for your enjoyment, here’s a beautiful video titled The Lion City II – Majulah by Photographer and filmmaker Keith Loutit that shows how much Singapore has been growing and changing over the past three years:

The above video is a sequel to The Lion City a tilt-shift video that apparently tackles the crushing heat of the city (maybe not the best video to prove why I want to go but the visuals are nicely shot):

What Predicts Children’s Fixed and Growth Intelligence Mind-Sets?

I just read an interesting paper in the journal Psychological Science that shows a parent’s view of failure is more important to a child’s growth than the parent’s views on intelligence.  Specifically, the paper concludes that, “Overall, parents who see failure as debilitating focus on their children’s performance and ability rather than on their children’s learning, and their children, in turn, tend to believe that intelligence is fixed rather than malleable.”

In other words, it’s important that parents don’t let kids think that their minds are fixed (i.e., they can’t do better simply because of who they are), but rather can always grow and overcome their failures if they keep trying.

If you’re visual, like me, you should click on the following image from Carol Dweck’s book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success.  It does a great job showing the difference between the two mind sets.

From Carol Dweck’s Mindset: The New Psychology of Success

Which one are you?

Just Sitting Here

It’s always amazing to see what others have accomplished in their lives.  Their amazing victories are out there for all to see – be it world travel, winning a gold medal or writing a book.  What we don’t see is all of their hard work, self-doubt and outright failures along their road to success.  This little comic from owlturd.com ends with a similar note – don’t just sit their and imagine, do it.  (Great, now I have Shia LeBeouf in my head).

Read More